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Henry Lloyd, a famous descendant of the Lloyd family, came to New York in 1711 and decided to take over his father’s land. The 3,000 acres located on Lloyd Neck was the perfect place to start a business and provide for a family. Considering he already owned a successful business in Boston this new venture was sure to bring fortune and happiness.

Historic Series: The Henry Lloyd Manor - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor

Historic Series: The Henry Lloyd Manor - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor

When he arrived he had six slaves and some goods that were considered valuable at the time such as bibles and needles. He had just gotten married three years earlier and was ready to start a family. The first Manor house was built for him and his wife Rebecca on the edge of Caumsett Park in March of that same year. Ten children came out of the marriage and after Rebecca died James married another woman, Mary.

Historic Series: The Henry Lloyd Manor - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor

After some time they acquired more slaves to work on the property including Jupiter Hammon. Jupiter was the first African-American poet that was published in the United States and was very close to the Lloyd family. Henry used the land very wisely and eventually cleared space to raise sheep, grow orchards and construct more buildings. After all his work the Manor became self sufficient with food, clothing, education and farms. Henry even imported apple trees to make cider which brought even more profit to the estate.

Historic Series: The Henry Lloyd Manor - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor

Historic Series: The Henry Lloyd Manor - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor

Not only was Henry a clever businessman but he was also a great leader. With his direction the Manor was a famous spot for trade as well as its natural recourses. The Lloyd family had everything they needed from food and goods to clothing and housing. When Henry passed away in 1763 he left the Manor to his sons. Having paid for his son James’ education his portion of the land was less than the others and since his other son James had died at age thirteen he left money to his daughters and grandchildren. Jupiter Hammon received a nice sum of money as well.

Historic Series: The Henry Lloyd Manor - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor

Historic Series: The Henry Lloyd Manor - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor

What is left of Henry’s legacy is the Manor house which is of post-medieval architectural design. This 17th century style is famous for its steep roofs, timber frame construction and small casement windows. They most often contained large chimneys and large fireplaces for cooking as well. It originally evolved from Romanesque architecture and was used throughout the Renaissance. In 1722 the house was enhanced with two attachments, one on the side and the other at the back. The kitchen was located in this side addition which had a chimney of its own.

Historic Series: The Henry Lloyd Manor - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor

Today the Manor house is preserved and maintained by the Lloyd Harbor Historical Society. It stands on Caumsett State Park grounds and sits next to the George Weir Barn which was constructed a year after Henry died.