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Being a nature lover you can count on me feeling at home at a place like Tackapausha Preserve. Located behind the Tackapausha Museum on Washington Avenue, it brings beauty in its purest form to Seaford, NY. If you need a place to escape from the rest of the world and you are local, this is it.

HIstoric Series: Takapausha Preserve - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor-Arena

HIstoric Series: Takapausha Preserve - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor-Arena

The preserve is free to enter and closes at sunset. It’s a great place for nature walks and exploring. Make sure you take note of the rules before you continue into the preserve, which are stated clearly at the gate entrances. You can also pick up a trail map at the museum to help guide you.

Taking good care of the preserve is important and even more crucial to the wildlife that live there. With 84 acres this sanctuary is the home of many small creatures including hundreds of bird species, like the ruby-throated hummingbird as well as Egyptian fruit bats. These species live amongst the plentiful oak and maple forests, ponds and streams.

HIstoric Series: Takapausha Preserve - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor-Arena

HIstoric Series: Takapausha Preserve - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor-Arena

There are three sections of the preserve, which are divided by major roads. However, you can follow the five mile nature trail that continues through the whole park. It fills the space between Merrick Road and Jerusalem Avenue.

You will find a small wetland between Clark and Jerusalem Avenue, a secluded pond (Duck Pond) in the section between Sunrise Highway and Clark Avenue and the Atlantic white cedar stand between Merrick Road and Sunrise Highway.

HIstoric Series: Takapausha Preserve - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor-Arena

I really enjoyed my visit to the preserve back in December 2012. I felt as if I was traveling through tunnels of trees that welcomed me with every step. I have to say fall is a perfect time to go to see all the beautiful colors of the leaves and feel the crispness of the atmosphere. Although the warmer seasons would be nice with all the shade from the trees.

HIstoric Series: Takapausha Preserve - Copyright 2012 Melissa O'Connor-Arena

The preserve and museum are both operated by the Nassau County Department of Recreation. The county acquired the land in 1938 and since has been one of the most popular preserves on the South Shore. It was named after Chief Tackapausha of the Massapequa Band of Algonkian-speaking peoples.

The Tackapausha Museum is an impressive 3,000 square foot space with animals exhibits as well as activities for children. If you are interested in learning about the ecology of Long Island, you will find it all here. Why not take advantage of this natural resource and explore the gifts of Mother Earth. You can exercise and explore at the same time and its free!

Museum hours are 10 am to 4 pm Wednesday through Saturday and 1 pm – 4 pm on Sunday. Admission for children ages 5-12 is $2 (under 5 is free) and $3 for adults and teens. You can reach them at 516-571-7443 for updates and information.